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Top 10 Interview Questions with The Right Answers.


It is normal to feel a certain degree of job interview nerves before and during a job interview. You may really want the job and know you have to perform under pressure, or you may be naturally shy.

You all know that the interviewer will be in control of the conversation and you do not know what questions will be asked. This can lead to anxiety and make you feel nervous in a job interview.


So Execkart has come up with the Article with toughest question that are asked in interview


Below are some of the Toughest Questions



1. Why do you want to work at our company?


TRAPS: This question tests whether you’ve done any homework about the firm. If youhaven’t, you lose. If you have, you win big. BEST ANSWER: This question is your opportunity to hit the ball out of the park, thanksto the in-depth research you should do before any interview. Best sources for researching your target company: annual reports, the corporate newsletter, contacts you know at the company or its suppliers, advertisements, articles aboutthe company in the trade press.

2. What are your career options right now?

TRAPS: The interviewer is trying to find out, “How desperate are you?”


BEST ANSWER: Prepare for this question by thinking of how you can position yourself as a desired commodity. If you are still working, describe the possibilities at your present firm and why, though you’re greatly appreciated there, you’re looking for something more (challenge, money, responsibility, etc.). Also mention that you’re seriously exploring opportunities with one or two other firms.


If you’re not working, you can talk about other employment possibilities you’re actually exploring. But do this with a light touch,speaking only in general terms.You don’t want to seem manipulative or coy. 3. Why have you been out of work so long? TRAPS: A tough questionif you’ve been on the beach a long time.You don’t want to seem like damaged goods.



BEST ANSWER: You want to emphasize factors which have prolonged your job search by your ownchoice. Example: “After my job was terminated, I made a conscious decision not to jump on thefirst opportunities to come along. In my life, I’ve found out that you can always turn a negative into a positive IF you try hard enough. This is what I determined to do. I decidedto take whatevertime I needed to think through what I do best, what I most want to do, where I’d like to do it…and then identify those companies that could offer such an opportunity.”


“Also, in all honesty,you have to factor in the recession (consolidation, stabilization, etc.) in the (banking, financial services, manufacturing, advertising, etc.) industry.” “So betweenmy being selective and the companies in our industrydownsizing, the process has taken time. But in the end, I’m convinced that when I do find the right match, all that careful evaluation from both sides of the desk will have been well worthwhile for both the company that hires me and myself. 4. Tell me honestly about the strong points and weak points of your boss (company, management team, etc.)… TRAPS: Skillfull interviewers sometimesmake it almost irresistible to open up and air a littledirty laundry from your previous position. DON’T


BEST ANSWER: Remember the rule: Neverbe negative. Stress only the good points, no matter how charmingly you’re invited to be critical. Your interviewer doesn’t care a whit about your previous boss.He wants to find out how loyal and positive you are, and whether you’ll criticize him behind his back if pressed to do so by someone in this own company. This question is your opportunity to demonstrate your loyalty to those you work with.


5. What good books have you read lately?


TRAPS: As in all matters of your interview, never fake familiarity you don’t have. Yet you don’t want to seem like a dullard who hasn’t read a book since Tom Sawyer.



BEST ANSWER: Unless you’re up for a position in academia or as book critic for The New York Times, you’re not expected to be a literary lion. But it wouldn’t hurt to have read a handful of the most recent and influential books in your profession and on management.


Consider it part of the work of your job search to read up on a few of these leading books.But make sure they are quality books that reflect favorably upon you, nothing that could even remotely be considered superficial. Finally, add a recently published bestselling work of fictionby a world-class author and you’ll pass this questionwith flying colors.


6. Tell me about a situation when your work was criticized.


TRAPS: This is a tough question because it’s a more clever and subtle way to get you to admit to a weakness. You can’t dodge it by pretending you’ve never been criticized. Everybody has been. Yet it can be quite damaging to start admitting potential faults and failures that you’d just as soon leave buried


This questionis also intended to probe how well you accept criticism and direction.


BEST ANSWERS: Begin by emphasizing the extremely positive feedback you’ve gotten throughout your career and (if it’s true) that your performance reviews have been uniformly excellent.


Of course, no one is perfect and you always welcome suggestions on how to improve your performance. Then, give an example of a not-too-damaging learning experience from early in your career and relate the ways this lesson has since helped you. This demonstrates that you learned from the experience and the lesson is now one of the strongestbreastplates in your suit of armor.


If you are pressed for a criticism from a recent position, choose something fairly trivial that in no way is essential to your successful performance. Add that you’ve learnedfrom this, too, and over the past several years/months, it’s no longer an area of concern becauseyou now make it a regular practice to…etc.


Another way to answerthis question would be to describe your intention to broaden yourmaster of an area of growing importance in your field. For example, this might be a computer program you’ve been meaning to sit down and learn… a new management technique you’ve read about…or perhaps attending a seminar on some cutting-edge branchof your profession.

Again, the key is to focus on something not essential to your brilliant performance butwhichaddsyetanotherdimensiontoyour alreadyimpressiveknowledgebase.


7. What are your outsideinterests? TRAPS: You want to be a well-rounded, not a drone. But your potential employer would be even more turnedoff if he suspects that your heavy extracurricular load will interfere with your commitment to your work duties.



BEST ANSWERS: Try to gauge how this company’s culture would look upon your favorite outside activities and be guided accordingly. You can also use this question to shatter any stereotypes that could limit your chances. If you’re over 50, for example, describe your activities that demonstrate physical stamina. If you’re young, mention an activity that connotes wisdom and institutional trust, such as serving on the board of a popular charity. But above all, rememberthat your employeris hiring your for what you can do for him, not your family, yourself or outside organizations, no matter how admirable those activities may be. 8. The “FatalFlaw” question TRAPS: If an interviewer has read your resume carefully, he may try to zero in on a “fatal flaw” of your candidacy, perhapsthat you don’t have a college degree…you’ve been out of the jobmarket for some time…you never earned your CPA, etc.


A fatalflaw question can be deadly,but usually only if you respond by being overlydefensive. BEST ANSWERS:As every master salesperson knows, you will encounter objections (whether stated or merely thought) in every sale. They’re part and parcel of the buyer’s anxiety. The key is not to exacerbatethe buyer’s anxietybut diminish it. Here’s how… Whenever you come up againsta fatal flaw question: 1. Be completely honest, open and straightforward about admitting the shortcoming. (Showing you have nothing to hide diminishes the buyer’s anxiety.) 2. Do not apologize or try to explainit away. You know that this supposedflaw is nothing to be concerned about, and this is the attitude you want your interviewer to adopt as well.


3. Add that as desirable as such a qualification might be, its lack has made youwork all the harder throughout your career and has not prevented you from compiling an outstanding tack record of achievements. You might even give examples of how, through a relentless commitment to excellence, you have consistently outperformed those who do have this qualification. Of course, the ultimate way to handle “fatal flaw” questions is to prevent them from arising in the first place. You will do that by following the master strategy described in Question 1, i.e., uncovering the employers needs and them matching your qualificationsto those needs.


Once you’ve gotten the employer to start talking about his most urgently-felt wants and goals for the position,and then help him see in step-by-step fashion how perfectlyyour background and achievements match up with those needs, you’re going to have one very enthusiastic interviewer on your hands, one who is no longer looking for “fatalflaws”.


9. How do you feel about reporting to a younger person(minority, woman, etc)? TRAPS: It’s a shame that some interviewers feel the need to ask this question, but many understand the reality that prejudices still exist among some job candidates, and it’s better to try to flush them out beforehand.


The trap here is that in today’s politically sensitized environment, even a well-intentioned answer can result in planting your foot neatly in your mouth. Avoid anything which smacks of a patronizing or an insensitive attitude, such as “I think they make terrific bosses”or “Hey, some of my best friends are…” Of course, since almost anyonewith an IQ above room temperature will at leasttry to steadfastly affirm the right answer here, your interviewer will be judging your sincerity most of all.“Do you really feel that way?” is what he or she willbe wondering. So you must make your answer believable and not just automatic. If the firm is wise enough to have promotedpeopled on the basis of ability alone,they’re likely quite proud of it, and prefer to hire others who will wholeheartedly share their strong sense of fair play. BEST ANSWER: You greatly admire a company that hires and promotes on merit alone and you couldn’t agree more with that philosophy. The age (gender, race, etc.) of the person you report to would certainly make no difference to you. Whoever has that position has obviously earned it and knows their job well. Both theperson and the position are fully deserving of respect. You believe that all people in a company, from the receptionist to the Chairman, work best when their abilities, efforts and feelings are respected and rewarded fairly, and that includes you. That’s the best typeof work environment you can hope to find. 10. On confidential matters… TRAPS: When an interviewer presses you to reveal confidential information about a present or former employer, you may feel it’s a no-win situation. If you cooperate, you could be judged untrustworthy. If you don’t, you may irritate the interviewer and seem obstinate, uncooperative or overly suspicious.


BEST ANSWER: Your interviewer may press you for this information for two reasons. First, many companies use interviews to research the competition. It’s a perfectset-up. Here in their own lair, is an insider from the enemy camp who can reveal prized information on the competition’s plans, research, financial condition, etc.


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Key Takeaways


1. Prepare for these questions by thinking of how you can position yourself as a desired commodity.


2. Be completely honest, open and straightforward about admitting the shortcoming.


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